• AP Physics 1 Syllabus

     

    Curricular Requirements

    Page(s)

    CR 1

    Students and teachers have access to college-level resources including college-level textbooks and reference materials.

    1

    CR2a

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of kinematics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2b

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of the foundational principles of dynamics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2c

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles of circular motion and gravitation in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2d

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles of simple harmonic motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2e

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles linear momentum motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2f

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principle energy motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2g

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles of rotational motion in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2h

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles electrostatics in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2i

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles of electric circuits in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR2j

    The course design provides opportunities for students to develop understanding of foundational principles mechanical waves in the context of the big ideas that organize the curriculum framework.

    2

    CR3

    Students have opportunities to apply AP physics 1 learning objectives connecting across and enduring understandings as described in the curriculum framework. These opportunities must occur in addition to those within the laboratory investigations.

    6

    CR4

    This course provides students with opportunities to apply their knowledge of physics principles to real world questions or scenarios (including societal issues or technological innovations) to help them become scientifically literate citizens.

    5

    CR5

    Students are provided with the opportunity to spend a minimum of 25 percent of instructional time engaging in hands-on laboratory work with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations.

    5

    CR6a

    The laboratory work used throughout the course includes investigations that support the foundational AP Physics 1 principles.

    3,4,5

    CR6b

    The laboratory work used throughout the course includes guided-inquiry laboratory investigations allowing students to apply all seven science practices.

    3,4,5

    CR7

    The course provides opportunities for students to develop their communication skills by recording their evidence of their research of literature or scientific investigations through verbal, written, and graphic presentations.

    5,6

    CR8

    The course provides opportunities for students to develop written and oral scientific argumentation skills.

    5

     

     

     

     

    Course Introduction

    AP® Physics 1 is an algebra-based course in general physics that meets for 70 minutes most days and 50 minutes other days for the entire school year. General physics topics presented during the course closely follow those outlined by the College Board and also mirrors an introductory level university physics course.

    AP® Physics 1 is organized around six big ideas that bring together the fundamental science principles and theories of general physics. These big ideas are intended to encourage students to think about physics concepts as interconnected pieces of a puzzle. The solution of the puzzle is how the real world around them actually works. The students will participate in inquiry-based explorations of these topics to gain a more conceptual understanding of these physics concepts. Students will spend less of their time in traditional formula-based learning and more of their effort will be directed to developing critical thinking and reasoning skills.

    Textbook(s)

    Serway, Raymond A. and Vuille, Chris. College Physics AP® Edition. 11th Ed. Boston, Ma: Cengage Learning & Serway and Faughn, Physics, Holt

    Workbook

    Bueche, Frederick and Hecht, Eugene, Schaum’s Outline of College Physics, 11th Edition.

    Big Ideas for AP® Physics 1

    Big Idea 1: Objects and systems have properties such as mass and charge. Systems may have internal structure.

    Big Idea 2: Fields existing in space can be used to explain interactions.

    Big Idea 3: The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces.

    Big Idea 4: Interactions between systems can result in changes in those systems.

    Big Idea 5: Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws.

    Big Idea 6: Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena.

    The big ideas for AP® Physics 1 are correlated to the content of the course and to the lab and inquiry-based investigations done throughout school year in the following table.

     

     

     

     

     

    AP® Physics 1 Course Topic

    Correlation to College Physics, 11th Edition

    Big Idea 1: Objects and systems have properties such as mass and charge. Systems may have internal structure.

     

    Enduring Understanding 1.A: The internal structure of a system determines many properties of the system.

    Essential Knowledge 1.A.1: A system is an object or a collection of objects. Objects are treated as having no internal structure.

    Topics 4.3-4.7, p. 92-110; Topic 5.3, p. 129; Topic 5.6, p.142-144

    Essential Knowledge 1.A.5: Systems have properties determined by the properties and interactions of their constituent atomic and molecular substructures. In AP® Physics, when the properties of the constituent parts are not important in modeling the behavior of the macroscopic system, the system itself may be referred to as an object.

    Topics 4.3-4.7, p. 92-110; Topic 5.3, p. 129; Topic 5.6, p.142-144

    Enduring Understanding 1.B: Electric charge is a property of an object or system that affects its interactions with other objects or systems containing charge.

    Essential Knowledge 1.B.1: Electric charge is conserved. The net charge of a system is equal to the sum of the charges of all the objects in the system.

    Topics 15.1, 15.2, p. 495-503, 520-521

     

    Essential Knowledge 1.B.2: There are only two kinds of electric charge. Neutral objects or systems contain equal quantities of positive and negative charge, with the exception of some fundamental particles that have no electric charge.

    Topic 15.1, p. 495-497, 520-521

     

    Essential Knowledge 1.B.3: There are only two kinds of electric charge. Neutral objects or systems contain equal quantities of positive and negative charge, with the exception of some fundamental particles that have no electric charge.

    Topic 15.1, p. 496-497, 520-521

     

    Enduring Understanding 1.C: Objects and systems have properties of inertial mass and gravitational mass that are experimentally verified to be the same and that satisfy conservation principles.

    Essential Knowledge 1.C.1: Inertial mass is the property of an object or a system that determines how its motion changes when it interacts with other objects or systems.

    Topics 26.8, p. 856

    Essential Knowledge 1.C.2: Gravitational mass is the property of an object or a system that determines the strength of the gravitational interaction with other objects, systems, or gravitational fields.

    Topics 26.8, p. 856

    Essential Knowledge 1.C.3: Objects and systems have properties of inertial mass and gravitational mass that are experimentally verified to be the same and that satisfy conservation principles.

    Topics 26.8, p. 856

    Enduring Understanding 1.E: Materials have many macroscopic properties that result from the arrangement and interactions of the atoms and molecules that make up the material.

    Essential Knowledge 1.E.2: Matter has a property called resistivity.

    Topic 17.4, p. 573-575, 586-587

    Big Idea 2: Fields existing in space can be used to explain interactions.

     

    Enduring Understanding 2.A: A field associates a value of some physical quantity with every point in space. Field models are useful for describing interactions that occur at a distance (long-range forces) as well as a variety of other physical phenomena.

    Essential Knowledge 2.A.1: A vector field gives, as a function of position (and perhaps time), the value of a physical quantity that is described by a vector.

    Topics 1.9 – 1.11, p. 16-23, 25, 28-29

    Enduring Understanding 2.B: A gravitational field is caused by an object with mass.

    Essential Knowledge 2.B.1: A gravitational field g at the location of an object with mass m causes a gravitational force of magnitude mg to be exerted on the object in the direction of the field.

    Topic 4.1 p. 81, 111-114; Topics 4.2, 4.3, p. 86-93, 111-115; Topics 4.6, 4.7 p. 102-110, 112, 113, 116-120; Topic 5.1, p. 124; Topic 5.3, p. 130-131

    Essential Knowledge 2.B.2: The gravitational field caused by a spherically symmetric object with mass is radical and, outside the object, varies as the inverse square of the radial distance from the center of that object.

    Topic 4.2, p. 86-88, 113

    Big Idea 3: The interactions of an object with other objects can be described by forces.

     

    Enduring Understanding 3.A: All forces share certain common characteristics when considered by observers in inertial reference frames.

    Essential Knowledge 3.A.1: An observer in a particular reference frame can describe the motion of an object using such quantities as position, displacement, distance, velocity, speed, and acceleration.

    Topics 2.1-2.4, p. 31-58; Topics 3.1-3.3 p. 59-79

    Essential Knowledge 3.A.2: Forces are described by vectors.

    Topics 1.9-1.11, p. 6-23

    Essential Knowledge 3.A.3: A force exerted on an object is always due to the interaction of that object with another object.

    Topic 4.1, p. 80-82

    Essential Knowledge 3.A.4: If one object exerts a force on a second object, the second object always exerts a force of equal magnitude on the first object in the opposite direction.

    Topic 4.21, p. 90-92

    Enduring Understanding 3.B: Classically, the acceleration of an object interacting with other objects can be predicted by using Newton’s second law.

    Essential Knowledge 3.B.1: If an object of interest interacts with several other objects, the net force is the vector sum of the individual forces.

    Topics 4.1-4.7, p. 80-120

    Essential Knowledge 3.B.2: Free-body diagrams are useful tools for visualizing forces being exerted on a single object and writing the equations that represent a physical situation.

    Topics 4.3-4.7, p. 92-120

    Essential Knowledge 3.B.3: Restoring forces can result in oscillatory motion. When a linear restoring force is exerted on an object displaced form an equilibrium position, the object will undergo a special type of motion called simple harmonic motion. Example should include gravitational force exerted by the Earth on a simple pendulum and a mass-spring oscillator.

    Topic 5.5, p. 137-142; Topics 13.1-13.5, p. 424-440, 450-453

    Enduring Understanding 3.C: At the macroscopic level, force can be categorized as either long-range (action-at-a-distance) forces or contact forces.

    Essential Knowledge 3.C.1: Gravitational force describes the interaction of one object that has mass with another object that has mass.

    Topics 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, p. 81, 86-93, 102-120; Topic 5.1, p. 124; Topic 5.3, p. 130-131; Topic 7.5, p. 206-212, 220

    Essential Knowledge 3.C.2: Electric force results from the interaction of one object that has an electrical charge with another object that has an electric charge.

    Topic 15.2, p. 498-503, 520-522

     

    Topics 4.1-4.7, p. 80-120; Topic 5.5, p. 137-142; Topic 9.5, p. 278-283; Topics 13.1-13.5, p. 424-440

    Enduring Understanding 3.D: A force exerted on an object can change the momentum of the object.

    Essential Knowledge 3.D.1: The charge in momentum of an object is a vector in the direction of the net force exerted on the object.

    Topic 6.1, p. 161-166, 182-184

    Essential Knowledge 3.D.2: The change in momentum of an object occurs over a time interval.

    Topic 6.1, p. 161-166, 182-184

    Enduring Understanding 3.E: A force exerted on an object can change the momentum of the object.

    Essential Knowledge 3.E.1: The change in the kinetic energy of an object depends on the force exerted on the object and on the displacement of the object during the interval that the force is exerted.

    Topic 5.3, p. 126-135, 153-155

    Enduring Understanding 3.F: A force exerted on an object can cause a torque on the object.

    Essential Knowledge 3.F.1: Only the force component perpendicular to the line connecting the axis of rotation and the point of application of the force results in a torque about that axis.

    Topic 8.1 p. 224-228

    Essential Knowledge 3.F.2: The presence of a net torque along any axis will cause a rigid system to change its rotational motion or an object to change its rotational motion about that axis.

    Topic 8.4 p. 238-246

    Essential Knowledge 3.F.3: A torque exerted on an object can change the angular momentum of an object.

    Topic 8.6 p. 249-253

    Enduring Understanding 3.G: Certain types of forces are considered fundamental.

    Essential Knowledge 3.G.1: Gravitational forces are exerted at all scales and dominate at the larges distance and mass scales.

    Topic 7.5 p. 206-212

    Big Idea 4: Interactions between systems can result in changes in those systems.

     

    Enduring Understanding 4.A: The acceleration of the center of mass of a system is related to the net force exerted on the system, where

    Essential Knowledge 4.A.1: The linear motion of a system can be described by the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of its center of mass.

    Topic 8.2 p. 228-233

    Essential Knowledge 4.A.2: The acceleration is equal to the rate of change of velocity with time, and velocity is equal to the rate of change of position with time.

    Topics 2.1-2.4 p. 31-53; Topics 3.1-3.3 p. 59-73

    Essential Knowledge 4.A.3: Forces that systems exert on each other are due to interactions between objects in the systems. If the interacting objects are parts of the same system, there will be no change in the center-of-mass velocity of that system.

    Topic 8.2, p. 232-233, 256-257

    Enduring Understanding 4.B: Interactions with other objects or systems can change the total linear momentum of a system.

    Essential Knowledge 4.B.1: The change in linear momentum for a constant-mass system is the product of the mass of the system and the change in velocity of the center of mass.

    Topic 6.1 p. 161-166, 182-184

    Essential Knowledge 4.B.2: The change in linear momentum of the system is given by the product of the average force on that system and the time interval during which the force is exerted.

    Topic 6.1 p. 161-166, 182-184

    Enduring Understanding 4.C: Interactions with other objects or systems can change the total energy of a system.

    Essential Knowledge 4.C.1: The energy of a system includes its kinetic energy, potential energy, and microscopic internal energy. Examples should include gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and kinetic energy.

    Topics 5.2, 5.3, p.126-135, 153-156; Topic 5.5, p. 137-142, 153, 155-156, 158-160

    Essential Knowledge 4.C.2: Mechanical energy (the sum of kinetic and potential energy) is transferred into or out of a system when an external force is exerted on a system such that a component of the force is parallel to its displacement. The process through which the energy is transferred is called work.

    Topics 5.1, 5.3, p. 122, 132-135, 153-155

    Enduring Understanding 4.D: A net torque exerted on a system by other objects or systems will change the angular momentum of the system.

    Essential Knowledge 4.D.1: Torque, angular velocity, angular acceleration, and angular momentum are vectors and can be characterized as positive or negative depending upon whether they give rise to or correspond to counterclockwise or clockwise rotation with respect to an axis.

    Topics 7.1, 7.2, p. 190-195,215-217, 220; Topic 8.1 p. 224-228; Topic 8.6, p. 249-259, 261-266

    Essential Knowledge 4.D.2: The angular momentum of a system may change due to interactions with other objects or systems.

    Topic 8.6, p. 249-259, 261-266

    Essential Knowledge 4.D.3: The change in angular momentum is given by the product of the average torque and the time interval during which the torque is exerted.

    Topic 8.6, p. 249-259, 261-266

    Big Idea 5: Changes that occur as a result of interactions are constrained by conservation laws.

     

    Enduring Understanding 5.A: Certain quantities are conserved, in the sense that the changes of those quantities in a given system are always equal to the transfer of that quantity to or from the system by all possible interactions with other systems.

    Essential Knowledge 5.A.1: A system is an object or a collection of objects. The objects are treated as having no internal structure.

    Topic 4.2, p.82-92; Topics 4.6, 4.7, p. 100-110; Topic 5.3, p. 129-135; Topic 5.6, p. 142-144.

    Essential Knowledge 5.A.2: For all systems under all circumstances, energy, charge, linear momentum, and angular momentum are conserved. For an isolated or a closed system, conserved quantities are constant. An open system is one that exchanges any conserved quantity with its surroundings.

    Topic 5.6, p. 142-144; Topic 6.2, p. 166-169; Topic 8.6, p. 249-252; Topic 18.4, p. 599-602.

    Essential Knowledge 5.A.3: An interaction can be either a force exerted by objects outside the system or the transfer of some quantity with objects outside the system.

    Topic 4.1 p. 80-82; Topic 5.1, p. 121-124.

    Essential Knowledge 5.A.4: The boundary between a system and its environment is a decision made by the person considering the situation to simplify or otherwise assist in analysis.

    Topic 4.2, p. 92-110

    Enduring Understanding 5.B: The energy of a system is conserved.

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.1: Classically, an object can only have kinetic energy since potential energy requires an interaction between two or more objects.

    Topic 5.2, p. 126-129, 153-155

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.2: A system with internal structure can have internal energy, and changes in a system’s internal structure can result in changes in internal energy. Includes mass-spring oscillators and simple pendulums.

    Topics 13.1-13.5, p. 424-440

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.3: A system with internal structure can have potential energy. Potential energy exists within a system if the objects within that system interact with conservative forces.

    Topics 5.3-5.6, p. 129-144, 153, 155-160

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.4: The internal energy of a system includes the kinetic energy of the objects that make up the system and the potential energy of the configuration of the objects that make up the system.

    Topics 5.2, 5.3, 5.5, p. 126-135, 137-142, 153-160

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.5: Energy can be transferred by an external force exerted on an object or system that moves the object or system through a distance; this energy transfer is called work. Energy transfer in mechanical or electrical systems may occur at different rates. Power is defined as the rate of energy transfer into, out of, or within a system.

    Topics 5.1-5.7, p. 121-160

    Essential Knowledge 5.B.9: Kirchhoff’s loop rule describes conservation of energy in electrical circuits. The application of Kirchhoff’s laws to circuits is introduced in Physics 1.

    Topics 18.4, p. 599-602, 612-619

    Enduring Understanding 5.C: The electric charge of a system is conserved.

    Essential Knowledge 5.C.1: Kirchhoff’s junction rule describes the conservation of electric charge in electrical circuits. Since charge is conserved, current must be conserved at each junction in the circuit. Examples should include circuits that combine resistors in series and parallel. [Physics 1: covers circuits with resistors in series, with at most one parallel branch, one battery only.]

    Topics 18.4, p. 599-602, 612-619

    Enduring Understanding 5.D: The linear momentum of a system is conserved.

    Essential Knowledge 5.D.1: In a collision between objects, linear momentum is conserved. In an elastic collision, kinetic energy is the same before and after.

    Topics 6.2, 6.3, p. 166-176

    Essential Knowledge 5.D.2: In a collision between objects, linear momentum is conserved. In an inelastic collision, kinetic energy is not the same before and after the collision

    Topics 6.2, 6.3, p. 166-176

    Essential Knowledge 5.D.3: The velocity of the center of mass of the system cannot be changed by an interaction within the system. [Physics 1: includes no calculations of centers of mass; the equation is not provided until Physics 2].

    Topic 8.2, p. 228-233

    Enduring Understanding 5.E: The angular momentum of a system is conserved.

    Essential Knowledge 5.E.1: If the net external torque exerted on the system is zero, the angular momentum of the system does not change.

    Topic 8.6, p. 249-255, 261-266

    Essential Knowledge 5.E.2: The angular momentum of a system is determined by the location and velocities of the objects that make up the system. The rotational inertia of an object or system depends upon the distribution of mass within the object or system. Changes in the radius of a system or in distribution of mass within the system result in changes in the system’s rotational inertia, and hence in its angular velocity and linear speed for a given angular momentum. Examples should include elliptical orbits in an Earth-satellite system. Mathematical expressions for the moments of inertia will be provided where needed. Students will not be expected to know the parallel axis theorem.

    Topic 8.6, p. 249-255, 261-266

    Big Idea 6: Waves can transfer energy and momentum from one location to another without the permanent transfer of mass and serve as a mathematical model for the description of other phenomena.

     

    Enduring Understanding 6.A: A wave is a traveling disturbance that transfers energy and momentum.

    Essential Knowledge 6.A.1: Waves can propagate via different oscillation modes such as transverse and longitudinal.

    Topic 13.7, p. 441-443, 450; Topic 14.1, p. 457-458

    Essential Knowledge 6.A.2: For propagation, mechanical waves require a medium, while electromagnetic waves do not require a physical medium. Examples should include light traveling through a vacuum and sound not traveling through a vacuum.

    Topic 13.7, p. 441-443, 450; Topic 14.1, p. 457-458

    Essential Knowledge 6.A.3: The amplitude is the maximum displacement of a wave from its equilibrium value.

    Topic 13.8, p. 444-445, 453-454

    Essential Knowledge 6.A.4: Classically, the energy carried by a wave depends upon and increases with amplitude. Examples should include sound waves.

    Topic 14.4, p. 461-462

    Enduring Understanding 6.B: A periodic wave is one that repeats as a function of both time and position and can be described by its amplitude, frequency, wavelength, speed and energy.

    Essential Knowledge 6.B.1: For a periodic wave, the period is the repeat time of the wave. The frequency is the number of repetitions of the wave per unit time.

    Topic 13.8, p. 444-447; Topic 13.9, p. 453-454

    Essential Knowledge 6.B.2: For a periodic wave, wavelength is the repeat distance of the wave.

    Topic 13.8, p. 444-447; Topic 13.9, p. 453-454

    Essential Knowledge 6.B.4: For a periodic wave, wavelength is the ratio of speed over frequency.

    Topic 13.8, p. 444-447; Topic 13.9, p. 453-454

    Essential Knowledge 6.B.5: The observed frequency of a wave depends on the relative motion of source and observer. This is a qualitative treatment only,

    Topic 14.6, p. 466-470, 488

    Enduring Understanding 6.D: Interference and superposition lead to standing waves and beats.

    Essential Knowledge 6.D.1: Two or more wave pulses can interact in such a way as to produce amplitude variations in the resultant wave. When two pulses cross, they travel through each other; they do not bounce off each other. Where the pulses overlap, the resulting displacements of the two pulses. This is called superposition.

    Topic 13.10, p. 447-448; Topic 14.7, p. 471-472

    Essential Knowledge 6.D.2: Two or more traveling waves can interact in such a way as to produce amplitude variations in the resultant wave.

    Topic 13.10, p. 447-448; Topic 14.7, p. 471-472

    Essential Knowledge 6.D.3: Standing waves are the result of the addition of incident and reflected waves that are confined to a region and have nodes and antinodes. Examples should include waves on a fixed length of string, and sound waves in both closed and open tubes.

    Topic 14.8, p. 473-482, 488, 491-494

    Essential Knowledge 6.D.4: The possible wavelengths of a standing wave are determined by the size of the region to which it is confined.

    Topic 14.8, p. 473-482, 488, 491-494

    Essential Knowledge 6.D.5: Beats arise from the addition of waves of slightly different frequency.

    Topic 14.11, p. 482-484

     

    Resources

    Textbook

    Serway, Raymond A. and Vuille, Chris. College Physics AP® Edition. 11th Ed. Boston, Ma: Cengage Learning

    Workbook

    Bueche, Frederick and Hecht, Eugene, Schaum’s Outline of College Physics, 11th Edition.

    Instructional Strategies

    The AP Physics 1 course is conducted using inquiry-based instructional strategies that focus on experimentation to develop students’ conceptual understanding of physics principles. The students begin studying a topic by making observations and discovering patterns of natural phenomena. The next steps involve developing, testing, and applying models. Throughout the course the students construct and use multiple representations of physical processes, solve multi-step problems, design investigations, and reflect on knowledge construction through self-assessment rubrics.

    In most labs, students will use Flinn Scientific inquiry labs, I/O labs and PhET lab computer simulations.

    Course Syllabus

    Unit 1. Kinematics[CR2a]

    • Kinematics in one-dimension: constant velocity and uniform accelerated motion
    • Vectors: vector components and resultant
    • Kinematics in two-dimensions: projectile motion

    Big Idea 3

    Learning Objectives: 3.A.1.1, 3.A.1.2, 3.A.1.3

    Unit 2. Dynamics[CR2b]

    • Newton’s Third Law
    • Newton’s Second Law
    • Applications of Newton’s Second Law
    • Friction
    • Interacting objects: ropes and pulleys

    Big Idea 1, 2, 3, 4

    Learning Objectives: 1.C.1, 1.C.1.3, 2.B.1.1, 3.A.2.1, 3.A.3.1, 3.A.3.2, 3.A.3.3, 3.A.4.1, 3.A.4.2, 3.A.4.3, 3.B.1.1, 3.B.1.2, 3.B.1.3, 3.B.2.1, 3.C.4.1, 3.C.4.2, 4.A.1.1, 4.A.2.1, 4.A.2.2, 4.A.2.3, 4.A.3.1, 4.A.3.2

    Unit 3. Circular Motion and Gravitation [CR2c]

    • Uniform circular motion
    • Dynamic of uniform circular motion
    • Universal Law of Gravitation

    Big Idea 1, 2, 3, 4

    Learning Objectives: 1.C.3.1, 2.B.1.1, 2.B.2.1, 2.B.2.2, 3.A.3.1, 3.A.3.3, 3.B.1.2, 3.B.1.3, 3.B.2.1, 3.C1.1, 3.C.1.2, 3.C.2.1, 3.C.2.2, 3.G.1.1, 4.A.2.2

     

    Unit 4. Energy [CR2f]

    • Work
    • Power
    • Kinetic energy
    • Potential energy: gravitational and elastic
    • Conservation of energy

    Big Idea 3, 4, 5

    Learning Objectives: 3.E.1.1, 3.E.1.2, 3.E.1.3, 3.E.1.4, 4.C.1.1, 4.C.1.2, 4.C.2.1, 4.C.2.2, 5.A.2.1, 5.B.1.1, 5.B.1.2, 5.B.2.1, 5.B.3.1, 5.B.3.2, 5.B.3.3, 5.B.4.1, 5.B.4.2, 5.B.5.1, 5.B.5.2, 5.B.5.3, 5.B.5.4, 5.B.5.5, 5.D.1.1, 5.D.1.2, 5.D.1.3, 5.D.1.4, 5.D.1.5, 5.D.2.1, 5.D.2.3

    Unit 5. Momentum [CR2e]

    • Impulse
    • Momentum
    • Conservation of momentum
    • Elastic and inelastic collisions

    Big Idea 3, 4, 5

    Learning Objectives: 3.D.1.1, 3.D.2.1, 3.D.2.2, 3.D.2.3, 3.D.2.4, 4.B.1.1, 4.B.1.2, 4.B.2.1, 4.B.2.2, 5.A.2.1, 5.D.1.1, 5.D.1.2, 5.D.1.3, 5.D.1.4, 5.D.1.5, 5.D.2.1, 5.D.2.2, 5.D.2.3, 5.D.2.4, 5.D.2.5, 5.D.3.1

    Unit 6. Simple Harmonic Motion [CR2d]

    • Linear restoring forces and simple harmonic motion
    • Simple harmonic motions graphs
    • Simple pendulum
    • Mass-spring systems

    Big Idea 3, 5

    Learning Objectives: 3.B.3.1, 3.B.3.2, 3.B.3.3, 3.B.3.4, 5.B.2.1, 5.B.3.1, 5.B.3.2, 5.B.3.3, 5.B.4.1, 5.B.4.2

    Unit 7. Rotational Motion [CR2g]

    • Torque
    • Center of mass
    • Rotational kinematics
    • Rotational dynamics and rotational inertia
    • Rotational energy
    • Angular momentum
    • Conservation of angular momentum

    Big Idea 3, 4, 5

    Learning Objectives: 3.F.1.1, 3.F.1.2, 3.F.1.3, 3.F.1.4, 3.F.1.5, 3.F.2.1, 3.F.2.2, 3.F.3.1, 3.F.3.2, 3.F.3.3, 3.F.3.4, 4.A.1.1, 4.D.1.1, 4.D.1.2, 4.D.2.1, 4.D.2.2, 4.D.3.1, 4.D.3.2, 5.E.1.1, 5.E.1.2, 5.E.2.1

    Unit 8. Mechanical Waves [CR2j]

    • Traveling waves
    • Wave characteristics
    • Sound
    • Superposition
    • Standing waves on a string
    • Standing sound waves

    Big Idea 6

    Learning Objectives: 6.A.1.1, 6.A.1.2, 6.A.1.3, 6.A.2.1, 6.A.3.1, 6.A.4.1, 6.B.1.1, 6. B.2.1, 6.B.4.1, 6.B.5.1, 6.D.1.1, 6.D.1.2, 6.D.1.3, 6.D.2.1, 6.D.3.1, 6.D.3.2, 6.D.3.3, 6.D.3.4, 6.D.4.1, 6.D.4.2, 6.D.5.1

    Unit 9. Electrostatics [CR2h]

    • Electrical charge and conservation of charge
    • Electric force: Coulomb’s law

    Big Idea 1, 3, 5

    Learning Objectives: 1.B.1.1, 1.B.1.2, 1.E.2.1, 1.B.3.1, 3.C.2.1, 3.C.2.2, 5.A.2.1

    Unit 10. DC Circuits [CR2i]

    • Electrical resistance
    • Ohm’s Law
    • DC circuits
    • Series and parallel connections
    • Kirchhoff’s Laws

    Big Idea 1, 5

    Learning Objectives: 1.B.1.1, 1.B.1.2, 1.E.2.1, 5.B.9.1, 5.B.9.2, 5.B.9.3, 5.C.3.1, 5.C.3.2, 5.C.3.3

     

    Laboratory Investigations and the Science Practices

    The AP Physics 1 course devotes over 25% of the time to laboratory investigations. [CR5] The laboratory component of the course allows the students to demonstrate the seven science practices through a variety of investigations in all of the foundational principles.

     

    The students use guided-inquiry (GI) or open-inquiry (OI) in the design of their laboratory investigations. Some labs focus on investigating a physical phenomenon without having expectations of its outcomes. In other experiments, the student has an expectation of its outcome based on concepts constructed from prior experiences. In application experiments, the students use acquired physics principles to address practical problems. Students also investigate topic-related questions that are formulated through student designed/selected procedures.

     

    All investigations are reported in a laboratory journal. Students are expected to record their observations, data, and data analyses. Data analyses include identification of the sources and effects of experimental uncertainty, calculations, results and conclusions, and suggestions for further refinement of the experiment as appropriate. [CR7]

     

    Unit

    Lab Investigation

    Unit 1. Kinematics [CR6a]

    1.       Exploring Free-Fall

     

    2.       Graphing Motion

    Unit 2. Dynamics [CR6a]

    3.       Newton’s Second Law

     

    4.       Coefficient of Friction

    Unit 3. Circular Motion and Gravitation

    5.       Uniform Circular Motion

    Unit 4. Energy [CR6a]

    6.       Conservation of Energy on an Inclined Plane

     

    7.       Conservation of Elastic Potential Energy

    Unit 5. Momentum [CR6a]

    8.       Conservation of Linear Momentum

    Unit 6. Simple Harmonic Motion [CR6a]

    9.       Hooke’s Law and Simple Harmonic Motion for Elastic Materials

     

    10.    Simple Pendulums

    Unit 7. Rotational Motion [CR6a]

    11.    Rotational Motion and Angular Momentum

     

    12.    Torque

    Unit 8. Mechanical Waves [CR6a]

    13.    Mechanical Waves

     

    14.    Speed of Sound

    Unit 9.Electrostatic [CR6a]

     

    Unit 10.DC Circuits [CR6a]

    15.    Electrical Circuits

     

    16.    Resistance and Resistivity

     

     

    Instructional Activities

    Throughout the course, the students engage in a variety of activities designed to build the students’ reasoning skills and deepen their conceptual understanding of physics principles. Students conduct activities and projects that enable them to connect learned in class to real world applications.